Lecture Night: Human Evolution & Skin Color

Hear about human evolution through the lens of skin color from Dr. Ellen Quillen of Wake Forest University.

Our skin is a phenomenal organ: it protects us from the sun and rain, helps us regulate heat, and keeps microbes out and our insides in. Not only that, but it encodes the last two million years of human evolutionary history. From losing our fur to walking upright to our remarkable range of variation in skin color, we will discuss how our skin made us the species we are today.

Dr. Ellen Quillen decided to become a geneticist in 6th grade health class when someone explained to her how a baby of two brown-eyed parents could have blue eyes. Trained in evolutionary and statistical genetics and anthropology, Dr. Quillen is a professor in the Department of Molecular Medicine at Wake Forest School of Medicine where her research focuses on understanding how human evolutionary history and the interactions of our genes with the environment influence our health.

Event date: 
Saturday, February 15, 2020 - 7:00pm
Event address: 
634 W. Fourth St. #110
Winston-Salem, NC 27101
Skin: A Natural History Cover Image
$24.95
ISBN: 9780520275898
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Published: University of California Press - February 20th, 2013

We expose it, cover it, paint it, tattoo it, scar it, and pierce it. Our intimate connection with the world, skin protects us while advertising our health, our identity, and our individuality. This dazzling synthetic overview is a complete guidebook to the pliable covering that makes us who we are.


Living Color: The Biological and Social Meaning of Skin Color Cover Image
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ISBN: 9780520283862
Availability: Order Processes in 1-5 Days Depending on Store Stock
Published: University of California Press - October 17th, 2014

Living Color is the first book to investigate the social history of skin color from prehistory to the present, showing how our body’s most visible trait influences our social interactions in profound and complex ways. In a fascinating and wide-ranging discussion, Nina G.