2018 Festival Authors

2018 Festival of Books and Authors
All author events take place on Saturday, September 8 unless otherwise indicated.


Kelly Barnhill is the author of The Girl Who Drank the Moon, the 2017 Newbery Medal Winner, a New York Times bestseller, an Entertainment Weekly Best Middle Grade Book of the Year, a Publisher’s Weekly Best Book of the Year, and an Indie bestseller. Her new book for adults, Dreadful Young Ladies and Other Stories, is a collection of reality-bending stories teeming with uncanny characters whose lives unfold in worlds at once strikingly human and eerily original.

The Struggle is Real: Navigating Pivotal Points of Childhood: 11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m. / Winston Square Park
What the Fiction? Genre-Bending Books: 1:30–2:30 p.m. / Reynolds Place
Booksigning: 2:45 p.m.



Anne Bogel is the creator of the popular blog “Modern Mrs. Darcy” and host of the podcast “What Should I Read Next?” Her new book is I’d Rather Be Reading: The Delights and Dilemmas of the Reading Life, a relatable and highly readable essay collection for book lovers everywhere that examines the magical and maddening aspects of the reading life.

    

What to Read Next with Modern Mrs. Darcy, Anne Bogel: 1–2 p.m. / Mountcastle Forum
Booksigning: 2:15 p.m.



Suzanne Bouffard has a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Duke University and has written about education and child development for The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Daily Beast, U.S. News and World Report, and Parents, among others. The Most Important Year: Pre-Kindergarten and the Future of Our Children is the first book to provide an eye-opening look at why pre-K matters for children and society, what it should look like and do, and what it takes to create effective pre-K programs.

    

The Most Important Year: Pre-Kindergarten and the Future of Our Children: 10:30–11:30 a.m. / Mountcastle Forum
Booksigning: 11:45 a.m.
Presented with support from Family Services


Rick Bragg is a journalist and writer known for his nonfiction books, especially those about his family in Alabama. He has won more than 50 awards for his writing, including a Pulitzer Prize in 1996 recognizing his work at The New York Times. Bragg’s most recent book, The Best Cook in the World: Tales from My Momma’s Table, is part food memoir, part cookbook, and fully a tribute to Bragg’s mother as he shares classic family recipes, many pre-dating the Civil War, and remembrances in his classic storytelling style.

  

Our Prince of Scribes: Remembering Pat Conroy: 10–11 a.m. / Calvary Moravian Church
The Best Cook in the World: 3–4 p.m. / Calvary Moravian Church
Booksignings: 11:15 a.m. & 4:15 p.m.
Presented with support from Dewey’s and StoryWork International


Jeffrey Brown is one author/illustrator of the bestselling Star Wars: Jedi Academy series and the Darth Vader series. His bestselling graphic novel for kids, Lucy & Andy Neanderthal, was a Junior Library Guild Selection, a New York Library’s Best 50 Books for Kids pick, and a National Parenting Product Award-winner. Brown is on tour for his newest installment in the Lucy & Andy Neanderthal series: Bad to the Bones.

 

Words & Pictures: Graphic & Illustrated Novels: 10–10:45 a.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Graphic Novel Workshop for Kids: 2:30–3:30 p.m. / Sawtooth School  Sold out ticketed event.
Booksigning: 11 a.m.


Edgar Cantero is a writer and cartoonist from Barcelona working in Catalan, Spanish, and English. He is the New York Times bestselling author of Meddling Kids and This Body’s Not Big Enough for Both of Us, an action-packed, zany, genre-bending nod to classic noir.

    

What the Fiction? Genre-Bending Books: 1:30–2:30 p.m. / Reynolds Place
Booksigning: 2:45 p.m.


Roshani Chokshi is the New York Times bestselling author of Aru Shah and the End of Time, the first middle grade novel in the newly launched “Rick Riordan Presents” imprint. Chokshi is also the author of the young adult books in the Star-Touched series.

    

Check Your Reality at the Door: YA Fantasy: 12:15–1:15 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Booksigning: 1:30 p.m.


Zinzi Clemmons' debut novel, What We Lose, was a finalist for the Carnegie Medal, the Aspen Words Literary Prize, and the National Book Critics Circle Leonard Prize. Clemmons teaches writing at Occidental College in Los Angeles and was a 2017 National Book Award 5 Under 35 Honoree. In 2012, when she moved home to care for her mother who was dying of cancer, she began keeping a diary of the experience. Later, the diary helped her structure What We Lose, which asks complicated questions about belonging, grief, and identity. What We Lose was chosen as a Freshman Read for students entering Salem College. Book sales will be provided by Bookmarks with a booksigning following the program. Presented with support from Salem College  

   

Keynote Opening Event: Thursday, September 6 at 7:30 p.m.
Hanes Auditorium, Salem College, 500 East Salem Avenue, Winston-Salem

 


Zoraida Córdova is Ecuadorian born and New York City raised. She is the author of The Vicious Deep urban fantasy trilogy and the young adult Brooklyn Brujas series, as well as the adult romance series On the Verge. Set in the backdrop of Brooklyn, Bruja Born is a fast-paced story full of love, magic, and rich Latinx culture interwoven seamlessly into one thrilling novel.

    

Check Your Reality at the Door: YA Fantasy: 12:15–1:15 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Booksigning: 1:30 p.m.


Christina Dalcher is the author of Vox, which was named one of Entertainment Weekly’s and SheRead’s books to read after The Handmaid’s Tale. It was also named one of Good Morning America’s “Best Books to Bring to the Beach This Summer” picks. Set in an America where half the population has been silenced, VOX is the harrowing, unforgettable story of what one woman will do to protect herself and her daughter.

    

What the Fiction? Genre-Bending Books: 1:30–2:30 p.m. / Reynolds Place
Booksigning: 2:45 p.m.


KJ Dell’antonia is a writer and a regular contributor to The New York Times, where she wrote and edited the Motherlode blog from 2011 until 2016 and was a contributing editor to the Well Family section from 2016–2017. Her new book is How to Be a Happier Parent: Raising a Family, Having a Life, and Loving (Almost) Every Minute.

    

Slow Down & Simplify: 12:30–1:15 p.m. / Reynolds Place
Booksigning: 1:30 p.m.


Georgann Eubanks is an inveterate storyteller, writer, and teacher of writing who has published poetry, fiction, and profiles in numerous publications. Her Literary Trails series from UNC Press provides driving tours across North Carolina describing the settings where the state’s many writers have found inspiration and materials for their work. The Month of Their Ripening: North Carolina Heritage Foods Through the Year highlights 12 foods exemplary of NC’s culture and history.

  

The Month of Their Ripening: 11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m. / Mountcastle Forum
Booksigning: 1 p.m.


Lamar Giles is an author, speaker, and founding member of We Need Diverse Books, a nonprofit dedicated to changing the face of publishing. Giles has been featured on NPR, CNN, Publishers Weekly, Flavorwire, and is the editor of Fresh Ink: An Anthology that includes ten short stories, a graphic novel, and a one-act play about topics like gentrification, acceptance, untimely death, coming out, and poverty, and ranges in genre from contemporary realistic fiction to adventure and romance.

    

Fresh Ink: A YA Anthology: 11 a.m.–12 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Booksigning: 12:15 p.m.


Maurene Goo is the author of several books for young adults, including I Believe in a Thing Called Love, which was a Publishers Weekly and seventeen.com top YA book of the year. The Way You Make Me Feel is a laugh-out-loud story of love, new friendships, and one unique food truck. With Goo’s signature warmth and humor, she tells a relatable story of falling in love and finding yourself in the places you’d never have thought to look.

    

Crossover Books for Teens & Adults: 10:30–11:15 a.m. / Reynolds Place
Our Stories, Our Voices: 2:45–3:45 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Booksignings: 11:30 a.m. & 4 p.m.


Ellen Hopkins is the award-winning author of 13 New York Times bestselling novels including the Crank series. She also has established Ventana Sierra, a nonprofit organization helping youth-in-need find safe housing and encouraging them to pursue career goals through higher education and the arts. People Kill People, her compelling and complex new young adult novel, tackles gun violence and white supremacy.

    

Truth You Don’t See: YA Authors on Reality: 1:30–2:30 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Our Stories, Our Voices: 2:45–3:45 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Booksigning: 4 p.m.


Matthew Horace is a CNN law enforcement and security expert analyst, senior crisis manager, and contributor to the Wall Street Journal “Crisis Of The Week” column. He is a 28-year veteran of federal, state, and local law enforcement. The Black and the Blue: A Cop Reveals the Crimes, Racism, and Injustice in America’s Law Enforcement addresses the convergence of technology, policing, and community unrest and shares real life policing anecdotes while addressing systemic racism inside of the profession.

    

The Black & the Blue: 1:45–2:45 p.m. / Calvary Moravian Church
Booksigning: 3 p.m.


Silas House is the nationally bestselling author of five novels including The Coal Tattoo and Same Sun Here. A former commentator for NPR’s “All Things Considered,” his writing has appeared in Oxford American, Narrative, and Newsday, as well as multiple anthologies. House is a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers and the winner of the Nautilus Award, an EB White Award, the Appalachian Book of the Year, the Lee Smith Award, among others. His new novel, Southernmost, is a journey of self-discovery and an examination of toxic masculinity, morality, and family.

    

Setting Out to Journey In: Stories of Discovery & Displacement: 11:30 a.m.–12:15 p.m. / Reynolds Place
Book Club Essentials: 2:15–3:15 p.m. / Mountcastle Forum
Booksigning: 3:30 p.m.
Presented in honor of Victor F. Harllee, Jr.


Ladee Hubbard is the winner of the Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer’s Award and is the author of The Talented Ribkins, a wildly imaginative debut novel inspired by W. E. B. DuBois’s essay “The Talented Tenth.” Fueled by Hubbard’s imaginative writing, she tackles race, class, politics, and what binds a family together.



Books & Brews: 4:30–5:30 p.m. / Footnote
Booksigning: 5:30 p.m. / Footnote


Tiffany D. Jackson is the author of NAACP Image Award nominated Allegedly and Monday’s Not Coming, named to the Indie Next List for Children’s Books. A gripping, relentless, and timely novel, Monday’s Not Coming is a heartbreaking story of a missing teenager, a community that seems not to notice, and a best friend who will go to whatever lengths it takes to find her missing friend.

    

Crossover Books for Teens & Adults: 10:30–11:15 a.m. / Reynolds Place
Truth You Don’t See: YA Authors on Reality: 1:30–2:30 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Booksignings: 11:30 a.m. & 2:45 p.m.


David Joy is the author of The Weight of This World and Where All Light Tends to Go, an Edgar finalist for Best First Novel. The Line That Held Us is about the cover-up of an accidental death and the dark consequences that reverberate through the lives of four people who will never be the same again.

    

Books & Brews: 4:30–5:30 p.m. / Footnote
Booksigning: 5:30 p.m. / Footnote


Crystal Hana Kim is the Director of Writing Instruction for Leadership Enterprise for a Diverse America. Her debut novel, If You Leave Me, is an emotionally riveting novel about war, family, and forbidden love. It’s the saga of two ill-fated lovers in Korea and the heartbreaking choices they are forced to make in the years surrounding the civil war.

    

Book Club Essentials: 2:15–3:15 p.m. / Mountcastle Forum
Finding Home: Stories of Immigrants & Refugees:
3:45–4:45 p.m. / Reynolds Place
Booksigning: 5 p.m.


Stephen Kuusisto is the author of the memoirs Have Dog, Will TravelPlanet of the Blind, a New York Times “Notable Book of the Year;” and Eavesdropping: A Memoir of Blindness and Listening. He currently teaches at Syracuse University, where he holds a professorship in the Center on Human Policy, Law, and Disability Studies.

    

Have Dog, Will Travel: 4–4:45 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Booksigning: 5 p.m.
Presented with support from Adrienne Amos Livengood


Claire Legrand, a librarian and New York Times bestselling author, was nominated for the 2017 Edgar Award for Some Kind of Happiness, her middle grade novel about mental illness. Her newest novel, Furyborn, debuted at #4 on the New York Times bestseller list and is the first book in the Empirium Trilogy, a young adult epic fantasy series.

    

Check Your Reality at the Door: YA Fantasy: 12:15–1:15 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Booksigning: 1:30 p.m.


Kelly Link’s Magic for Beginners was chosen as one of the best books of the decade by Salon and was on best of the year lists by Time Magazine, Village Voice, San Francisco Chronicle, and The Capitol Times. Her collection of short stories, Pretty Monsters, was chosen for the 2018 Big Read presented by the National Endowment of the Arts and On the Same Page presented by Forsyth County Public Library each fall. These startlingly original stories tug at the seams of reality and defy expectations with terrific twists and turns.

   

Check Your Reality at the Door: YA Fantasy: 12:15–1:15 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
On the Same Page: 2:45–3:30 p.m. / Reynolds Place
Booksignings: 1:30 p.m. / Forsyth County Public Library Booth & 3:45 p.m. / Booksigning Tent
Presented with support from the Forsyth County Public Library’s On the Same Page program


Charlie Lovett is the New York Times bestselling author of The Bookman’s Tale and, most recently, The Lost Book of the Grail, a novel about an obsessive bibliophile’s quest through time to discover a missing manuscript the unknown history of an English Cathedral, and the secret of the Holy Grail. He is also the host of Inside the Writer’s Studio, a podcast regularly featuring bestselling and debut authors.

    

Exploring “The Great American Read:” 3:30–4:30 p.m. / Mountcastle Forum
Booksigning: 4:45 p.m.


Makiia Lucier is the author of historical fiction and fantasy books for young adults. Her new book for teens, Isle of Blood and Stone, combines rich descriptions with a compelling mystery. Lucier’s fantasy creates a vibrant world populated by appealing characters and tantalizing details about strange beasts and geographical fascinations.

   

Check Your Reality at the Door: YA Fantasy: 12:15–1:15 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Booksigning: 1:30 p.m.
Presented with support from 90.5 FM WSNC


Beth Macy is the author of the widely acclaimed and bestselling books Truevine and Factory Man. Based in Roanoke, Virginia for three decades, her reporting has won more than a dozen national awards, including a Nieman Fellowship for Journalism at Harvard. Her newest book is Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors, and the Drug Company That Addicted America. With compassion and humanity, Macy’s book is a crucial and many-faceted look at a stillunfolding national crisis, making it required reading for all.

    

Dopesick: 12:30–1:30 p.m. / Calvary Moravian Church
Booksigning: 1:45 p.m
Presented with support from Kilpatrick Townsend


Rebecca Makkai is the author of four books including The Hundred-Year House, which won the Novel of the Year Award from the Chicago Writers Association. The Great Believers is the story of friendship and redemption in the face of tragedy and loss in 1980s Chicago and contemporary Paris.

    

Book Club Essentials: 2:15–3:15 p.m. / Mountcastle Forum
Booksigning: 3:30 p.m.


Brooke McAlary is from the Blue Mountains near Sydney, Australia, but is currently slow-traveling around Canada with her family. She runs a blog and co-hosts the podcast Slow Your Home with her husband on minimalism and simple living. McAlary has written three books, including her latest, Slow: Simple Living for a Frantic World. 

    

Slow Down & Simplify: 12:30–1:15 p.m. / Reynolds Place
Booksigning: 1:30 p.m.
Presented with support from Triad Moms on Main


Stacy McAnulty is the 2017 Ezra Jack Keats New Writer Honor Recipient for Excellent Ed. Her other picture books include Earth! My First 4.54 Billion Years; Brave; Beautiful; and 101 Reasons Why I’m Not Taking a Bath. Her debut middle grade novel, The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl, was a featured Indie Next Children’s Pick and is an engaging story, full of heart and hope.

    

The Struggle is Real: Navigating Pivotal Points of Childhood: 11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m. / Winston Square Park
Booksigning: 1 p.m.
Presented with support from Forsyth Woman/Forsyth Family Magazines


David Barclay Moore’s debut middle grade novel, The Stars Beneath Our Feet, was a New York Times notable book, a Time magazine Top 10 Children’s Books of the Year, an ALA Notable Book, and the winner of the Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award for New Talent. Michael B. Jordan will be directing the movie adaptation of this powerful portrait of a boy teetering on the edge of adolescence, of grief, of violence.

    

The Struggle is Real: Navigating Pivotal Points of Childhood: 11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m. / Winston Square Park
Truth You Don’t See: YA Authors on Reality:1:30–2:30 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Booksigning: 2:45 p.m.
Presented with support from Wells Fargo


Joyce Moyer Hostetter’s debut novel Blue, about a North Carolina polio epidemic, won the International Reading Association Children’s Book Award and has been selected for the North Carolina Battle of the Books list in addition to receiving many other honors. Her fourth novel in the Bakers Mountain Stories series, Drive, features twin sisters who find themselves growing apart as they respond differently to their father’s postwar trauma.

    

Growing Up Was Never Easy: Historical Middle Grade Fiction: 1–2 p.m. / Winston Square Park
Booksigning: 2:15 p.m.
Presented with support from The Arts Council of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County’s Wells Fargo Arts-in-Education grant


Steve Nedvidek recently retired from Chick-Fil-A after a 30-year career, where he most recently helped start the Innovation discipline at the company, and taught innovation, creativity, and design thinking. He is one of the authors of the graphic novel series The Jekyll Island Chronicles, which convey a rich amount of history combined with alternate history in the time period between the two world wars. Part historical fact, part steampunk, these graphic novels have beene taught in Georgia schools and received an award last year from the Georgia Center of Books as one of the Top Ten Books All Young Georgians should read for 2017.  

  

Words & Pictures: Graphic & Illustrated Novels: 10–10:45 a.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Booksigning: 11 a.m.


Daniel José Older’s debut series for young adults, the Shadowshaper Cypher, won the International Latino Book Award, and the series was picked as NPR Best Books of the Year among other accolades. His new middle grade book, Dactyl Hill Squad, blends history and fantasy in the summer of 1863 as the Civil War rages between dinosaur-mounted armies down south and a tense New York City seems on the brink of exploding into riots.



Fresh Ink: A YA Anthology: 11 a.m.–12 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Growing Up was Never Easy: Historical Middle Grade Fiction: 1–2 p.m. / Winston Square Park
Booksigning: 2:15 p.m.
Presented with support from the Hispanic League of Winston-Salem


Elaine Neil Orr is a writer of fiction, memoir, and literary criticism. With stories set in Nigeria and the American South, she delves into themes of home, country, and spiritual longing. Swimming Between Worlds is her new novel about changes—cultural and personal—that the Civil Rights movement brought to the South, specifically to Winston-Salem.

    

Ticketed Event– Writing Home in Fiction & Memoir: A Workshop 11:45 a.m.–1:30 p.m. / Sawtooth School
Booksigning: 2 p.m.


Audrey Penn is the author of many children’s books, including the Chester Raccoon series, which contains the New York Times bestseller The Kissing Hand, celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. She has won multiple awards for her books, including being named a Caldecott Medal Nominee.

 

Storytime with Chester Raccoon: 12 –12:30 p.m. / Bookmarks
Booksigning: 1 p.m.
Presented with support from Tina S. Merhoff & Associates Pediatric Dentistry


Dav Pilkey has written and illustrated numerous popular, award-winning books for children, including the wildly popular Captain Underpants book series. Pilkey’s bestselling and critically acclaimed graphic novel series Dog Man, released in Fall 2016, was an instant #1 New York Times bestseller and has more than 10 million copies in print to date. Dog Man: Lord of the Fleasis the newest installment in the series, published by Scholastic on August 28, 2018. As a child, Pilkey was diagnosed with ADHD and dyslexia, which was frequently mistaken for bad behavior in class. Pilkey struggled in school and was often forced to sit in the school hallway, which is where he created both his Captain Underpants and Dog Man characters. Pilkey’s books are a magnet for reluctant readers and their humor is contagious for adults as well. 

Tickets Required: Reserved seating in Balcony, Mezzanine, and Orchestra: $15–$60 with each ticket including a copy of Pilkey’s new book, Dog Man: Lord of the FleasClick here to purchase tickets:  https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3489991

Kids Keynote Event: Friday, September 7 at 6:30 p.m. | RJ Reynolds Auditorium, 301 N. Hawthorne 
 


Mark Powell is the author of five novels, including his most recent, Small Treasons, a beautifully written, disturbing portrait of Americans searching for meaning in a violent, fragmented world. Incredibly timely, this novel captures the tensions and range of emotions conflicting Americans right now.



Our Prince of Scribes: Remembering Pat Conroy: 10 –11 a.m. / Calvary Moravian Church
Books & Brews: 4:30–5:30 p.m. / Footnote
Booksignings: 11:15 a.m. / Booksigning Tent & 5:30 p.m. / Footnote


Amy Reed is the editor of Our Stories, Our Voices, an anthology by 21 Young Adult authors sharing deeply personal thoughts of growing up female in America. Her newest young adult book is The Nowhere Girls, a searing and timely story about three young women who start a movement to change the misogynist culture at their high school.

  

Truth You Don’t See: YA Authors on Reality: 1:30–2:30 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Our Stories, Our Voices: 2:45–3:45 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Booksigning: 4 p.m.


Rahna Reiko Rizzuto is the author of the memoir Hiroshima in the Morning, which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle. Her novel, Shadow Child, is a haunting and suspenseful literary tale set in 1970s New York City and World War II-era Japan about three strong women, the dangerous ties of family and identity, and the long shadow our histories cast.

    

Setting Out to Journey In: Stories of Discovery & Displacement: 11:30 a.m. –12:15 p.m. / Reynolds Place
Booksigning: 12:30 p.m.


Ingrid Rojas Contreras was born and raised in Bogotá, Colombia. She received the Mary Tanenbaum Award for nonfiction and is the book columnist for KQED, the San Francisco Bay Area’s NPR affiliate. She teaches writing to immigrant high school students as part of a San Francisco Arts Commission initiative bringing artists into public schools. Fruit of the Drunken Tree is her debut novel set in Colombia during Pablo Escobar’s violent reign.

    

Setting Out to Journey In: Stories of Discovery & Displacement: 11:30 a.m. –12:15 p.m. / Reynolds Place
Finding Home: Stories of Immigrants & Refugees: 3:45–4:45 p.m. / Reynolds Place
Booksignings: 12:30 & 5 p.m.
Presented with support from High Point University’s Department of English


An advocate for homeless youth, Brenda Rufener’s debut novel Where I Live is an emotional portrayal of a very real, very prevalent, but often unspoken problem in the US about homelessness among teens. It was included on Bustle’s list of the “27 Most Anticipated YA Contemporary Books Hitting Shelves in 2018” calling it a “long overdue [book] in the young adult world.”

    

Truth You Don’t See: YA Authors on Reality: 1:30–2:30 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Booksigning: 2:45 p.m.


Aisha Saeed is the author of the young adult novel Written in the Stars and is a Pakistani-American writer, teacher, and attorney. One of the founding members of We Need Diverse Books, her debut middle grade book, Amal Unbound, is set in Pakistan and is the story of a girl’s fight to regain her life and dreams after being forced into indentured servitude to pay off her family’s debt.

    

The Struggle is Real: Navigating Pivotal Points of Childhood: 11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m. / Winston Square Park
Our Stories, Our Voices: 2:45–3:45 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Booksignings: 1 & 4 p.m.


Tom Santopietro, the bestselling author of seven books, worked as a manager of over 30 Broadway shows, including Phantom of the Opera. His latest book, Why to Kill a Mockingbird Matters, takes a 360 degree look at the Mockingbird phenomenon on both page and screen. He traces the writing of Lee’s novel, the impact of the Pulitzer Prize, and investigates the claim that the book is actually racist.

    

Exploring “The Great American Read:” 3:30–4:30 p.m. / Mountcastle Forum
Booksigning: 4:45 p.m.


T.R. (Tanya) Simon is the co-author of Zora and Me, a middle grade book that is a fictionalization of the early years of the literary giant Zora Neale Hurston. Zora & Me: The Cursed Ground is a follow-up novel that explores the idea of collective memory and the lingering effects of slavery.

 

Growing Up was Never Easy: Historical Middle Grade Fiction: 1–2 p.m. / Winston Square Park
Exploring “The Great American Read:” 3:30–4:30 p.m. / Mountcastle Forum
Booksignings 2:15


Gabe Soria has written for Cartoon Network and is an author for BOOM! Comics. He is the author of the Midnight Arcade series, a play-your-way adventure in which the reader is trapped in a 1980s-era haunted arcade.

    

Words & Pictures: Graphic & Illustrated Novels: 10 –10:45 a.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Booksigning: 11 a.m.


Michel Stone is the recipient of the South Carolina Fiction Award for her debut novel The Iguana Tree. Her latest novel, Border Child, is told with empathy and is a daring and timely story about Mexican immigrants.

    

Crossover Books for Teens & Adults: 10:30–11:15 a.m. / Reynolds Place
Finding Home: Stories of Immigrants & Refugees: 3:45–4:45 p.m. / Reynolds Place
Booksignings: 11:30 a.m. & 5 p.m.


Vegas Tenold is an award-winning journalist from Norway. He has covered the far right in America for years as well as stories from all over the world. Everything You Love Will Burn: Inside the Rebirth of White Nationalism in America reveals how white supremacist and nationalist groups rose in influence to achieve political support at the highest levels of government, examining the transformation of once-small groups into threatening mainstream organizations.

    

Everything You Love Will Burn: 11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m. / Calvary Moravian Church
Booksigning: 12:30 p.m.


Jennifer Thermes is a children’s book author, illustrator, and map illustrator. Her newest book, Grandma Gatewood Hikes the Appalachian Trail, is a biography about the first woman to hike the Appalachian Trail solo at age 67.

    

Grandma Gatewood Hikes the Appalachian Trail: 10 –10:30 a.m. / Winston Square Park
Booksigning: 10:45 a.m.
Presented with support from Mast General Store


Tracy Deonn Walker Author Photo & Book Cover

Tracy Deonn Walker wrote her master’s thesis at UNC Chapel Hill about Superman, West African myths, and secret identities. Her essay about growing up black, female, and geeky is published in the anthology Our Stories, Our Voices. Her debut series, Descendants is a modern-day King Arthur retelling with Southern Black Girl Magic and will be published in 2020 and 2021.

 

Our Stories, Our Voices: 2:45–3:45 p.m. / Hanesbrands Theatre
Booksigning: 4 p.m.

 


Carole Boston Weatherford author photo and book cover

One of the leading poets and biographers writing for young people today, Carole Boston Weatherford is the New York Times bestselling author of more than 50 books, including Dorothea Lange: The Photographer Who Found the Faces of the Depression; How Sweet the Sound: The Story of Amazing Grace; and Be a King: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Dream and You.



Storytelling: 10:45–11:30 a.m. / Winston Square Park
Booksigning: 11:45 a.m.
Presented with support from Reynolda House Museum of American Art